There's some meta here worth pondering. "Deisgn Thinking(TM)" and its ilk are inevitable, in a culture built around 'products'. There has to be a simple, clear, marketable to a dumbed down population product of some kind to sell. But design as a fundamental human practice can't be packaged and sold.

Most people in our so-called 'modern' world have had their innate ability to observe, comprehend, and engage with systemic complexity beaten out of them since birth. Our professionalization of everything that used to be communally held and practiced adds to this pathology.

I imagine what Tim Brown might have meant is "everyone would (still) be a designer, if we hadn't thrown design as everyday human activity out the window long long ago in our mechanistic-deterministic cultures."

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In many (OK, all) other industrial nations, there is bullying, homophobia, gender sterotypes, racism, their own flavors of aggrieved entitled masculinity, and other similar psycho-social factors. You agree these are not unique to the USA, but then say they are important in understanding mass shooting frequency in the USA vs. other countries. So - how are they important?

If all these factors exist in those other countries, what then makes the difference in the USA? Not just in mass shootings, but in the drastically greater level of gun violence overall in the USA, compared to all these other countries?

It's got something to do with culture, for sure.

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Gopher! Now that takes me back...I was also online since before the http protocol displaced most everything else online, or at least pushed it out of sight and into the geek-only domain. There were pirates (different than hackers, then anyhow) and spammers and flame wars, but by comparison, the 'net was a small, friendly, and, most significantly, non-commercial place.

I watched conversations and arguments (on listservs and bulletin boards) about pros and cons of commercialization of the internet get steamrollered by the de facto commercialization of the internet. And now here we are...for better and worse.

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I'm appreciating your various perspectives on your title question in this piece. I 'm glad that near the end you finally write "A lot depends on your notion of success." Our culture's implicit notion of success is focused on material wealth and production, production, production of stuff, stuff and more stuff. Also on always doing, doing, doing. That is a very limited notion of 'success'. And in fact that idea of 'success' is causing life support system failures on local to global scales.

Multiple studies have show that aboriginal people spent half their 'working' time or less providing for basic needs. The rest was available for any kind of enjoyment of being alive in the world - art, craft, recreation, relating of various kinds (singing, dancing, games, stories, rituals, ceremonies, etc.). That to me seems much more a 'success' than any offerings of our contemporary industrial culture.

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